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Cooking Thread :: online book and video acess added here

Discussion in 'Hobbies and special interests' started by baltoed, Jul 30, 2014.

  1. baltoed

    baltoed DI Forum Adept

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    In an attempt to allow us to keep a better grip on this until cooking becomes its own sub section please consider adding your books and video downloads here..
     
  2. OP
    OP
    baltoed

    baltoed DI Forum Adept

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    The Virginia House-Wife, 1824.
    Mary Randolph was a well-to-do socialite in nineteenth-century Richmond, Virginia, before her husband was pushed out of his government job by his cousin and political rival Thomas Jefferson. Known for her hospitality and prowess in the kitchen, she opened a boarding house to help make ends meet. And toward the end of her life, she poured the sum of her culinary knowledge into this influential cookbook, which contains early recipes for gumbo and cornbread and the first recipe for macaroni and cheese ever published in the United States.

    Subject: Mary Randolph 1762- 1828; Godmother to Mrs. Robert E. Lee
    The U.S. Dept. of the Interior, National Park Service, Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial suggests this is the first truly American Cookbook; the first edition was published in 1824. See National Park Service - Museum Management Program for further details regarding Mrs. Randolph as well as her portrait and burial at Arlington National Cemetery.

    https://archive.org/details/virginiahousewif00randrich
     
  3. OP
    OP
    baltoed

    baltoed DI Forum Adept

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    Housekeeping in Old Virginia, 1878.
    Marion Fontaine Cabell Tyree, granddaughter of Founding Father and onetime Virginia governor Patrick Henry, assembled this collection of recipes and household tips from 250 prominent families in Virginia and the surrounding states. In addition to chapters on Old Dominion favorites such as buttermilk biscuits and Brunswick stew, this book contains a fascinating collection of remedies including a whiskey-and-cherry-bark cure for jaundice and mysterious “Chill Pills” made with strychnine and arsenic.

    https://archive.org/details/housekeepinginol01tyre
     
  4. OP
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    baltoed

    baltoed DI Forum Adept

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    What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking, 1881.
    In the years following the Civil War, a thirty-something former slave from Mobile, Alabama, named Abby Fisher migrated west to San Francisco, where she found success as a caterer and cook. Though Fisher was illiterate, friends in California transcribed this collection of her recipes. Alongside the popular dishes of the day are instructions for preparing dozens of pickles and preserves—Fisher’s specialties—and a long list of cakes and pies. This was believed to have been the first cookbook written by an African-American woman until scholars unearthed a short pamphlet published in Paw Paw, Michigan, in 1866. Nonetheless, it was groundbreaking and provides an unmatched look at the foods of the plantation South.

    https://archive.org/details/whatmrsfisherkno00fishrich
     
  5. OP
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    baltoed

    baltoed DI Forum Adept

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    La Cuisine Créole, 1885.
    With this foundational text of Creole cooking, an anonymous author (almost universally believed to have been Lafcadio Hearn, a Greek-Irish writer who later made his name reporting from Japan under the pen name Koizumi Yakumo) captured a swirl of dishes from Europe, Mexico, the Caribbean, Africa, and Louisiana just as they began to coalesce into the colorful cuisine that we recognize today. Chefs and housewives from all over New Orleans contributed their favorite recipes, throwing “Gombo file,” “Jambolaya,” and “Bouille-abaisse” into a national pot then mostly unseasoned by those Creole standards.

    https://archive.org/details/lacuisinecreolec00hearrich
     
  6. OP
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    baltoed

    baltoed DI Forum Adept

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    The Unrivalled Cook-Book and Housekeeper’s Guide, 1885.
    The mysterious “Mrs. Washington” chose her pseudonym, she writes in the introduction to her cookbook, in honor of the father of our country. But though her identity may be vague, the book is anything but. Stocked with recipes adapted from older European texts and the archives of an anonymous New Orleans family, it contains careful instructions for preparing everything from Russian beet soup to a classic bisque à la Creole flavored with “a peck of fat crawfish.”

    https://archive.org/details/unrivalledcookb00washgoog
     
  7. OP
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    baltoed

    baltoed DI Forum Adept

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    Here are an additional 50 *plus* old cookbooks that sit online awaiting only that you rediscover them and make use.

    ENJOY

    Vintage Cookbooks

    :dnr:
     
  8. PatO

    PatO DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer Veteran Marines

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    Thanks Ed, sufficient to carry me through my life time. My biggest desire right now are Thai recipes, lots on the internet, and also Vietnamese recipes.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    baltoed

    baltoed DI Forum Adept

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    While there are a ton of people that refer to all asian food as *chineee* I too favor Thai

    :dnr:
     
  10. OP
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    baltoed

    baltoed DI Forum Adept

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