Dumaguete Info Search


Local Foods

Discussion in '☋ Dumaguete City ☋' started by JerryHeide, May 1, 2009.

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  1. JerryHeide

    JerryHeide DI Member

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    What are the typical kinds of food that are popular, or the normal food of the locals?

    Jerry.
     
  2. Rhoody

    Rhoody DI Forum Luminary

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    If you mean streetfood you can find a small list here (actually it's from my tagalog times and the names might be slightly different in the Visayas.

    local restorant food usually includes
    adobo, sinigang, sisig, pancit, bicol express, halo-halo and and and...

    all with rice and not to forget sweet spaghetti... list here

    ... and of course, no celebration without:
    [​IMG]
     
  3. wixman

    wixman DI New Member

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    paklay, dinuguan, linat-ang baka, munggus, kalamungay, halang-halang, kinilaw, inun-unan
     
  4. balustre

    balustre DI Member

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    Grilled tuna belly, kalabasa/dabong/saluyot/tanglad/tuno, pako salad, sinugbang ihalason, puso sa saging salad, bulad, ginamos
     
  5. davfitz

    davfitz DI Forum Adept

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    To the OP - thanks for the title. When first I was leaving Canada to visit here, a lifelong friend advised "Remember, Dave, don't eat the local food!". He did this on a speaker phone call which Anne could hear. I am reminded of his foolish comment constantly.

    What is even more different besides rice three times a day is the presence and absence of various condiments and herbs.

    I never heard of banana catsup until my arrival in the Philippines. I'm sorry that I did. It has been banned in our house.

    Dill in any form does not really exist: the herb rarely. No pickles. No relish.

    In self defence, I frequently bake my own bread. Whole wheat flour is a search. Rye flour is non-existent. Passable pain francais is available from several sources.

    Mustard is mainly in the form of the USian "yellow poo" which one places on a hot-dog before discarding both together.

    Notable as well is any real lettuce. An attempt is made to grow and sell it but it would never stand a chance as a stalk in a Calgarian's Bloody Caesar. The foliage of the local variety suffices as a herb. The stalks - oh well!

    The greatest single delight is the discovery of kalamansi. Smaller and stronger than either lemon or lime. It is a delight to use whenever citrus is called for.

    Kalamansi is combined with soy, vinegar and small fiery peppers at the table to form "sawan" an a ubiquitous condiment.

    Salt is not usually found in a shaker but used by the pinch.

    There are many other differences. I trust that others will make further suggestions.
     
  6. dumaguetenia

    dumaguetenia DI Forum Adept

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    this thread makes me salivate, just the mention of all the food i miss a lot.

    .. sandwiches and spaghetti is sweet and for snacks not a meal
    ..everything is cooked
    ..meat always marinated in vinegar, garlic,soya sauce and again is sweet
    ..the awful the smell the better the taste :p
    ..your neighbour know what you having just the smell of it:D


    davfitz, now we were even, beause us here filipinos abroad have a lots to complain too.., but the general complained ; "food is taste less ":D
    we all glad that to be "RESOURCEFUL " is in dictionary that help a lot. :D
     
  7. OP
    OP
    JerryHeide

    JerryHeide DI Member

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    ok, it sounds good, maybe i'll need a translator...or maybe not maybe i don't want to know whats in it..:rolleyes: I'lljust try it and see if I like....

    Jerry.
     
  8. Arie

    Arie DI Forum Adept

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    would certainly give the local fruits a good look, there are some pretty tasty ones (and when you get a bit over enthousiast in the food tasting you can't go wrong with some bananas)

    funny about the tasteless, I often feel dishes lack spice in Philipines or maybe I just got unlucky

    love the chicken at least the province ones, it seems like a different bird then we tend to get served over here
     
  9. davfitz

    davfitz DI Forum Adept

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    "the awful the smell the better the taste"

    How very true, Dumaguetania - at least the smell part. I can not testify to the taste because I never got past the smell.

    I have a deal with my family which has finally come to fruition in the past hour. I ask them to warn me when they wish to fry the tiny dried fish which they enjoy. Warn - so that I might temporarily abandon the house! I don't think that they have taken me seriously until now as they did not wish to offend me. Well now it has taken hold for the first time - to the benefit of all!

    Permit me to correct a typo in my earlier post. I don't know what got into my typing fingers. I meant celery, repeat celery! The Philippine head lettuce is the best I have ever tasted!
     
  10. dumaguetenia

    dumaguetenia DI Forum Adept

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    Davfitz , you must be glad it was over and done ?:D you better get used to it, you going to be there for good. Burning brown sugar next to it will help you bear the smell.
    ..i just wondering, how's is your mashed potatoes ?, i notice that our potatoes are smaller and kind of hard. not at all like her in canada.
     
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