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Review Ssrv visa

Discussion in 'Expat Section' started by djfinn6230, Dec 1, 2017.

  1. djfinn6230

    djfinn6230 DI Forum Adept

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    We are here on Balikbayan & have tickets to leave just before the year is up. After a month in the USA we will return and hopefully get another B.B. stamp at Cebu. If they will not stamp it, then we will apply for the SRRV and pay the big bucks. Cannot get 14a cuz asawa will not water down her US citizenship with a dual citizenship. I completely understand this. Besides, I like the advantages of the SRRV. I had seen something, somewhere in a forum about the ex-Filipinos wife applying for the SRRV instead of the foreign born spouse. Advantage should be a much lower cost for ex-Filipino SRRV, maybe $1.7K US. Then she claims the bans as a spouse. Anybody here about this? Thoughts? Thanks.


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  2. AlwaysRt

    AlwaysRt DI Forum Patron Highly Rated Poster Blood Donor Veteran Air Force Marines

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    Not sure what you mean by water down US citizenship with dual citizenship? Dual citizenship does absolutely nothing to US citizenship that I am aware of.

    Yes, former Filipino SRRV application fee is $1,400 for her + $300 for you as her spouse + $1,500 deposit.
     
  3. OP
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    djfinn6230

    djfinn6230 DI Forum Adept

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    I don’t want to open a can of worms here, and I know nothing about the dual citizenship process, but: oftentimes when when becoming a citizen of another country, it does involve some sort of renunciation of previous citizenship. NOT SURE about Philippines. If it involved renunciation of USA citizenship, this would not cause one to lose US citizenship by any means. They still want you to pay taxes. It takes a concerted effort to lose USA citizenship. But the foreign oath, documented as being taken, does seem to mar the loyalty of the citizen.

    Thanks for confirming what I thought about SRRV. Previously I used to hear a lot about the 10k or 20k fees associated with the classic SRRV but that should apply only to those people not fortunate enough as to be married to a former Filipina. At such a low cost it might be best just to go ahead and do it.



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  4. AlwaysRt

    AlwaysRt DI Forum Patron Highly Rated Poster Blood Donor Veteran Air Force Marines

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    The process of her becoming a US citizen required her to renounce her Philippine citizenship. Once a US citizen it is a simple step to reaffirm her Philippine citizenship without affecting her US citizenship. Thus dual citizen vs one or the other.

    Going the SRRV route, she is not a Philippine citizen and does not have all the rights of a citizen (voting, unhindered land ownership...). However, depending upon what your plans and desires are the limitations may not be an issue. On the positive side, if you do not qualify for the extended courtesy SRRV on your own (former military...), you do qualify as her spouse (as stated above) and do not need to add to her reduced $1,500 investment requirement.
     
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  5. Edward K

    Edward K DI Forum Adept Veteran Navy

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    I'm interested in hearing more about DUAL Citizenship. A friend is going thru the same procedure (complicated but only cuz a name change between being born in PH and becoming a naturalized US at a young age).. In all research, found NO disadvantage to DUAL re: "...watered down..." ???????

    PS: FYI, as an aside, someone who is BORN in the PH but not yet with a DUAL, CAN own land...
     
  6. Jack Peterson

    Jack Peterson DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster SC Connoisseur Veteran Air Force

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    Yes correct, provided they have maintained Philippines citizenship.
     
  7. okiebound

    okiebound DI Forum Adept Showcase Reviewer ✤Forum Sponsor✤

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    Here is my experience....my husband was born in the Philippines, migrated to the US and had to renounce his Philippines citizenship to acquire US citizenship. When we moved back to the Philippines in 2009, he was able to obtain his dual citizenship status easily. We also go our US born daughter her dual citizenship. They didn't have to renounce their US citizenship at all.
     
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    djfinn6230

    djfinn6230 DI Forum Adept

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    Yes, admittedly watered down is a poor choice of words. It is a personal opinion only having no relation at all to official immigration policy. On the USA side, they seem to ignore the dual citizenship claim and will expect total compliance with USA laws regarding taxes, military service (registration for selective service) and the like. I am certain that dual citizenship is not a problem. It is personal. My wife’s opinion.

    And yes, a person born here can buy and own a certain amount of land. My wife owns land here. Thank you for clarifying. We have no reason for dual and will probably go the ex-Filipinos SRRV route with me being sponsored. SRRV has lots of perks as well.


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