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Tubeless versus tube type tires for motorcylces

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Forum' started by Dave & Imp, Feb 11, 2013.

  1. Dave & Imp

    Dave & Imp DI Forum Patron Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer

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    I recently replaced my original rear tire on my Yamaha 125 Yber. It was tubeless tire and I chose (they had no tubeless) to go with a tube type on the new replacement because vulcanizers cannot fix a tubeless tires here generally. After less than 10 km I had my first flat tire here in over 13,000 km. of travel. What has the experience been with the tubeless versus tube-type tires here in regard to flat tires. I am considering going back to tubeless if this frequency of flats tires continues. What has your experience been? Thanks
     
  2. a007esprit

    a007esprit DI Junior Member Showcase Reviewer

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    TUBLESS TIRE ON A YAMAHA Ybr

    Wel did replace my rear tire to a genuine new tubless tire , the dealer just had 1 tire , there not cheap but , never had a flat on beffor . did fix the old tire , just bought a repare kit for tubless tires on ebay
    Must say the Ybr is a very reliable bike , never let me down. just use genuine parts and your safe.
    Chris
     
  3. denpet

    denpet DI Senior Member Highly Rated Poster Blood Donor Veteran Air Force

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    Go tubeless and get yourself one of these
    Stop & Go International Pocket Tire Plugger for Tubeless Tires 1000 : Amazon.com : Automotive
    and one of these
    Slime 40001 Motorcycle Tire Inflator : Amazon.com : Automotive
    and you will be back on track within 5 min, and never have to push your bike to the next "Bolkit" again.
    I always bring it when on a big bike.

    (Don't forget to buy extra mushrooms... TIRE PLUGS, STOP & GO KIT (50 BAG) : Amazon.com : Automotive )

    As for tires, I use Duro tubeless. Lucky Terminal at end of boulevard have them in stock even for the Harley. They last about half of what one of the expensive ones does, but cost less than half. And with a few shrooms in the tire, I prefer to replace it more frequently...
     
  4. Tax refugee

    Tax refugee DI Member

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    Hi ya
    I have a Yamaha FZ 150 with a tubeless rear tyre and have traveled 1000s of km on and off the concrete without a puncher, also a XRM with 1000s km and a lots of punchers.
    I was on the ZF on the mountain road Candoni to Sipalay, 4’ nail in the rear tyre.

    My bike puncher repair kit with inflators was sitting on the table at home 200km away in Bacong, I had to pull the nail out of the tyre because it was hitting the guard, should have just pushed it in.

    It didn’t go flat straight away and managed to scoot down the road a bit and found a local vulcanizer, and then the real fun stared.

    The trye that has been fitted to the rear is the largest that will fit, without a proper tyre machine its virtually impossible to get the tyre off the rim, after pushing some rubber patch into the hole and inflating it, I scooted the 14 km into Sipalay, with a tight bead the trye did roll off the rim, sorta run flat :-)

    Next morning managed to find a repair shop with the right equipment and get the puncher fix.

    From what I’ve seen, when tryes with tubes in them get a puncher it goes flat straight away, this can be a bit scary at 70km on a XRM when the front or rear trye suddenly goes flat, with a tubes it seems to happen slower

    My moral is, make sure you pack you puncher repair kit.
     
  5. denpet

    denpet DI Senior Member Highly Rated Poster Blood Donor Veteran Air Force

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    As for the tubeless fix kit available locally, those where you push a sticky rubber rope through the hole, will not work with Duro tyres. Duro put some wax inside the tyre that will prevent the rubber plug to bond with the tyre, and it will eventually come out again.
     
  6. Knowdafish

    Knowdafish DI Forum Luminary

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    "Wax", or a mold releasing agent? If the tire was cleaned of this parting agent before use, it would likely make plugging a leak a viable option?
     
  7. shadow

    shadow DI Forum Luminary

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    Now that you have run a few KM on your tire, let almost all of the air out of it, ride it 100 feet or so, then re-inflate it. This will remove any kinks in the tube. Often new tubes get kinks when installed, and "vulcaters" here do not know how to prevent a kinked tube from causing a flat. On tubeless wheels that you want to put a tube in, best to take the tire off and check for rough spots on the castings inside the wheel, grind down as necessary.


    For you guys running spoked wheels, often they remove the liner. This assures them of return business. Make sure there is a good tube liner in your tire or the spokes will wear through a tube in a few thousand KM.

    Tire plugs (repair kit for tubeless tires) is a temporary emergency repair only, they are not intended as a permanent repair. There is a good reason for this.

    Larry
     
  8. SteveB

    SteveB DI Forum Adept

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    I have had many flats over the past 5 years here. Most were on the sides of the tubes, not where the tire meets the road surface and rarely did I find anything stuck in the tire. I have discovered that "under" inflation is the main culprit. Theese tire / tube combinations will lose pressure over time. Keep the pressure up and you will reduce the frequency of flats.
     
  9. RR_biker

    RR_biker DI Senior Member Veteran Marines

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    More or less the same I always did when the tube of the bicycle was repaired. Instead of riding with an almost empty tube for 100 feet, just put the bicycle upside down (so with the saddle on the ground) spin around the wheel while hitting the tire with your fist all around. Easy done.
    Putting your motorbike upside down is a bit more complicated, so I better follow up Larry's suggestion.
     
  10. Broadside

    Broadside DI Forum Patron

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    Put your bike on the main stand instead of the side stand and you can spin either wheel with ease.
     
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