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Best Posts in Thread: NGCP

  1. Dutchie

    Dutchie DI Forum Adept Showcase Reviewer Veteran Army

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    The problem isn't them poles, or any other type of maintenance, the problem is that there's no redundancy in their grid.
    The reason you don't see these regular blackouts in most other countries is not that there's no maintenance needed there (although having all non - high voltage grid lines underground obviously diminishes the need for maintenance to a great extent), but rather that there's redundant circuits. If one section of the grid needs to be shut down, then the redundant circuit takes over for all other areas, so almost no customers will be affected.
     
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  2. Rye83

    Rye83 with pastrami Admin Secured Account Highly Rated Poster SC Connoisseur Veteran Army

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    We used to have those many times per week, sometimes many days in a row, all completely unannounced. We went without power for a solid 2 weeks after Yolanda and water for nearly 2 months (the water pressure in Valencia still hasn't recovered to pre-Yolanda levels to this day).
    It seems to be seasonal. Heavy rain and wind have always knocked out the power pretty predictably. If you haven't been experiencing this over the years you have been lucky. There are a lot of failure points in the dilapidated infrastructure here. One only needs to look up to understand. At any given location the lines have at least a dozen ways for everything to come crashing down.
     
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  3. Rye83

    Rye83 with pastrami Admin Secured Account Highly Rated Poster SC Connoisseur Veteran Army

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    I imagine there are a LOT of poles. 10's, maybe 100's, of thousands of them. They only started mass producing/ordering metal ones maybe 5-8 years ago...but the majority of the smaller wooden ones are more than likely on the NORECO side of the house. I have no idea how long it takes to change out a pole but I would guess no less than an hour or two each. Multiply that by 10k poles (on the lower side in my estimate) and you have a sh*t ton of man hours. If we are talking the industrial main towers I would think each one would be measured in days instead of hours.

    With all that being said the electrical infrastructure here has improved drastically in the 10 years I have been here. If you are complaining about the frequency of brownouts either your memory is failing or you haven't been here long enough to remember how bad it used to be.
     
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  4. Edward K

    Edward K DI Senior Member Veteran Navy

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    Just a thought, but i'm not sure it's a redundancy problem, i think it's more of a problem in the distribution system. The NGCP 69kva system runs on STEEL towers, noreco's two-blackouts-this-month are for "changing wooden poles." So why not just disconnect the wooden pole circuits from the 69KVA system. Because the DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM is fooked up. Noreco's managers can't be that stupid, there just aren't enough cut off switches, ???? Makes no sense !!!...

    It's like the water system in the province. There is NO, repeat NO, water problem anywhere. I guarantee (almost) that if you actually plugged or repaired every leaking hose, you would have probably 30 % more water. That's a guess, based on water running down the roads of the province.
     
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  5. cabb

    cabb DI Forum Patron ✤Forum Sponsor✤

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    My understanding is that they do a very good job of managing how the the Li-ion batteries are used and have improved on the manufacturing costs more so than the battery itself. Although lately Elon has been talking about some new secret sauce, yet to be seen. The thing I found interesting is it really just thousands of 18650 battery connected together, not one big battery.

    https://insideevs.com/news/332702/everything-you-need-to-know-about-teslas-lithium-ion-batteries/
     
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  6. SkipJack

    SkipJack DI Senior Member

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    I don't know.
    Not all of the 69kv transmission line is on steel towers. There are sections through town that are still on wooden poles. You can see the new steel poles next to them waiting for the lines to be transferred.
     
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  7. jimeve

    jimeve DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer Veteran Army

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    So would I, You need to check them individually for failed ones. You can buy special clips to hold them together. I would Not attempt it. No patience at all.
    EV batteries are made with these sort of batteries.
     
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  8. jimeve

    jimeve DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer Veteran Army

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    Some Filipinos have been connecting those batteries together to make solar batteries and selling them on FB or using them for own use.
    Easy to do but need a lot of patience and good eye sight. Lazada sell them.
     
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  9. SkipJack

    SkipJack DI Senior Member

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    I don't know.
    Do you expect to be paid more than the generation rate?
    Why would they pay you more than they pay other generators?

    The other half of your bill is the "delivery charge". The cost of building and maintaining the wiring infrastructure. This is charged equally so people in the electrically dense town are subsidizing those who are at the end of long runs. The delivery charge is a fixed cost no matter how much electricity you use.

    Frankly, people who generate their own electricity get to avoid paying a portion of the cost of connecting their house to the grid. In this sense they are free loading on others.

    Some utilities are beginning to treat the delivery charge as a fixed rate. In this way people who generate their own electricity are still charged the cost of the infrastructure to connect their home to the grid. This is the fair way of distributing the infrastructure costs. If the customer does not want to participate they can disconnect from the grid and go their own way.

    I am tired of subsidizing other peoples bad economic decisions.
     
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  10. Dutchie

    Dutchie DI Forum Adept Showcase Reviewer Veteran Army

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    I looked into solar panels a bit, the problems I still wrestle with:
    1. When tied to the Noreco grid they pay you their "generation rate", which at best is only about half of what the customer pays per kwh. In other words, they don't do proper net-metering.
    2. Being tied to the grid, you still suffer blackouts, your solar system shuts down automatically during blackout, to avoid electrocuting Noreco's workmen. Only way to avoid this is with batteries and/or a different type inverter.
    3. Batteries are still quite expensive, if you'd manage to get one here, Tesla's home wall is priced around 11,000 US$ (including installation) last time I checked, and it's not rated to run your entire house on (you'd need at least two of them to run the whole lot).
     
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