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A couple projects around the house

Discussion in 'Property Development' started by ShawnM, Jan 27, 2018.

  1. ShawnM

    ShawnM DI Forum Patron ★★ Forum Sponsor ★★ Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer Blood Donor Veteran Air Force

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    I have a number of projects to do around the house when I get home but there are two that I want to run past folks to see if what I'm thinking is the best way forward or if someone has some other ideas.

    1) I have some barrels (lard barrels from a bakery) collecting rain water off the roof of the nipa guest house and a couple more off the acrylic corrugated roofing over the garden area. From the roof over the 2nd floor 2 downspouts end up going to roof drains to catch basins out to a drainage ditch. The 2 on the back side of the house are ran down and stop at the moment.

    I want to put in an underground tank to run these into. I'm thinking about a poured concrete tank (no block) instead of a plastic tank. I was thinking 6'X6'X4' deep; which is just over 1000 gallons if my math is right.

    I'm only using rain water for the garden and flower beds; we have a well, pump and tank for internal household use. I'll plumb the overflow to the existing catch basins, may need to add one.

    With where I'm looking at putting the tank I do not want to put in a hand pump for fear some visiting kids would run into it and crack their pumpkin. I was looking at a submersible pressure pump, which would pump water as soon as you open the hose bib. The ones I've looked at on-line are way more expensive than I would want to go as they are rated for deeper tanks or wells. This tank will only be 4' deep and even using a hose to water around the house those are way more than needed to push the water. I'm curious if anyone has seen smaller rated ones at Polaris or elsewhere?

    If I can't find what I want for $200 or less then I would have to turn to a regular submersible pump and use a switch to turn it on or off. A little inconvenient but not the end of the world in the grand scheme of things. Any other options?

    2) On the second floor of the house is a concrete deck/roof of the first floor. Over half of this "open area" is a roof which is where the dirty kitchen, CR, refrigerator, freezer, etc. and where we entertain when we have folks over. Great area unless it is windy and/or heavy rain. Water will come in.

    The back side is solid (EVG panel) but I want to block in the 2 "sides". I want to go with glass block for sunlight and the top 2' would be aluminum frames with screens for airflow. I think the look of the glass block would work with the style of the house. With the overhang of the roof I don't think I'd get much rain through the screens.

    I have absolutely no experience with glass block and have not been on a project where it was used. I've researched a bit with Mr. Google and YouTube so I understand the basic concept of installation.

    The areas to block in are about 6' from pony wall to beam and 10' column to column. To make this work and to be able to attach the aluminum frames for the screens I need 4 sides to attach the block.

    For the side opposite the exterior stairs I was thinking of tying in a 6" beam where the top of the blocks will be, minus the 2' for the screens so 3 1/2' give or take how the block sits once I do a dry setting. With about a 10' span and only 6" beam I am planning to put a column in the center to support the beam.

    The exterior stairs is a completely different animal but will still have to put in the beam and then a column from pony wall to existing beam where the pony wall meets the opening for the stairs. For the landing I am unsure how to tackle that until I get home and stare at it for awhile. That is an "L" shaped pony wall with nothing overhead to tie into.

    I hope that made sense as I explained it.

    I know they have glass block both in Tanjay and Dumaguete, but not sure if they have the T-spacers or wall brackets...anyone notice if they are available in Dumaguete?

    Since I have no experience with glass block I definitely want to hire someone with experience to work the block. This is an exterior area that will need to stand up to the wind and rain so a solid individual will be needed...too important to "wing" it. I obviously want this done when I'm home so I can watch every step of the way.

    These are the ideas I have and welcome any advice, especially on the glass block.

    Shawn
     
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    Last edited: Jan 27, 2018
  2. DAVE1952

    DAVE1952 DI Member

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    Hi Shawn, hope you don't mind me giving an opinion here and to be honest I am just a layman with scant knowledge of construction techniques, but I would see no problem to build a small underground tank using 6'' hollow block, only thing I would do is put in a middle wall to tie the longer sides together and install a couple of openings in it to equalise the water both sides, perhaps this would save money in the long run and not waste wood on shuttering?I did once condemn the use of block in the build of a swimming pool but we are talking about a lot of pressure from the huge amount of water required in that.

    Regarding your rooftop covered terrace area, I think from what you say, you have full visibility of the landscape on three sides, if you enclose two of them you will only have the view from one side only, a 10' by 6' glass block wall would frighten me as I cannot see a way to engineer a quality strong wall using that material? also having some experience with greenhouses I do know if you leave the door open during strong winds the glass can blow out at the opposite end, we used to remove a few panes of glass during winter to allow a flow of air and to stop the wind pressure from building up, you are perhaps creating a similar situation with your structure? the wind will get in at one end and have no where to go? I know you said it would be ventilated near the roof but will that be enough? there is a rooftop bar near where I live it has a covered roof and three sides are open this is on the fourth floor, when there is wind and rain they have heavy duty tarpaulins that are rolled down and they do give good protection from the elements, also they have lasted quite a few years it sure is good quality material. As I said this is not an expert opinion but when you have a rooftop view it would be a shame reduce it to only see out one end.
     
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    ShawnM

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    Dave...I've used the local hollow blocks and there would not be many scenarios where I would use them again. I know you can find better ones but more hassle than it would be worth for the limited quantity I would need. Placing concrete for the entire tank really does not take all that much more time.

    I'm including some pictures to make the upstairs a bit clearer. I am definitely going to lose a lot in the way of views and that does concern me, but at the same token I do have 1/2 the 2nd floor that is open. The glass block sizes available are 8X8X4, with the block being attached on 4 sides (from what I looking at doing), reinforced horizontally and the layout of the 2nd floor and screens above the block I feel pretty good that wind should not be an issue. Obviously the quality of installation play a major factor as well.

    I'm going to install new cabinets and countertop as well for the dirty kitchen...depends on how much time I have at home before I mobilize for my next project (hoping to have 2 months at home, but it could be much less).

    Appreciate the feedback!

    Shawn

    Outside of house.JPG Exterior Stairs.JPG Upstairs (1).JPG Upstairs (2).JPG
     
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    ShawnM

    ShawnM DI Forum Patron ★★ Forum Sponsor ★★ Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer Blood Donor Veteran Air Force

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    The wife was able to get someone to start working on the excavation for the tank before I get home...looks like a few of my dogs want to supervise what's going on.

    Shawn
    Digging (1).JPG
     
  5. cabb

    cabb DI Senior Member Highly Rated Poster ✤Forum Sponsor✤

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    With respect to #2, I would think some kind of movable wall would best. Something like sliding glass panels, a retractable panel or the cheapest would be a heavy duty clear plastic panel that could be rolled up. Similar to what you see on some tricycles to keep the rain out.
     
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    ShawnM

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    Yea, I'm rethinking my original plan; mostly as Dave brought up with losing the view. I definitely do not want to go with tarps or the like, want something more permanent that will go with the house. I really like the look of the glass block so I am thinking about going with a few rows of glass block on both the top and bottom and screened, sliding windows in the middle. A bit of work to add the additional columns and beams to support everything, but I can size them to get the correct fit for the glass block.

    I haven't made up my mind yet and still have some time to decide before I get started.

    I posted these items to get some feedback on the best way to make this happen so all comments are much appreciated.

    Shawn
     
  7. Brian Oinks

    Brian Oinks That's Mr. Pig to you Boy! :) Highly Rated Poster

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    What about using Roller Doors? A friend posted this earlier, I love the concept where you could use larger size door to make open air living on a nice cool day with a breeze, or roll it shut if it looks like rain, especially love the clear panels!
    Roller Door Window_1906786899075502512_n.jpg
     
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  8. maykoppa

    maykoppa DI New Member Veteran Army

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    You have a Great view up on your rooftop deck you don't want to lose that
     
  9. DAVE1952

    DAVE1952 DI Member

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    Wow! what an ugly contraption and it just spoils what is otherwise a nice looking Kitchen with a balanced look of traditional and modern.
    I guess this is a French design and perhaps good for chopping of the head of your Asawa when she P****s you off?
     
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    ShawnM

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    I'm going back and forth on the best way to block things in and keep a view as well as air flow. I do know they make clear glass blocks instead of the opaque type folks use for showers and such; I just need to see what is available in Dumaguete when I get home.

    The roller door is an interesting concept but it is a bit much and I would assume something that would have to be custom made.

    I'm trying to figure how to incorporate the glass block as I do think it goes with the "boxy" style of my house, plus I've always wanted to work with them.

    Shawn
     

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