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BISAYA, OR NOT TO BISAYA?

Discussion in 'Expat Section' started by Crane op, Dec 22, 2020.

  1. jimeve

    jimeve DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer Veteran Army

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    What's it in Bisaya then?
     
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  2. Notmyrealname

    Notmyrealname DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer

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    I am no expert but 'oO' ?
     
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  3. EandN

    EandN DI Member

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    I don't know.
    Bisaya is a single 'O', Tagalog is a double 'OO'. Written and spoken.
     
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  4. Notmyrealname

    Notmyrealname DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer

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    O, I see.
     
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  5. djfinn6230

    djfinn6230 DI Senior Member

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    It is “oo” in both Cebuano and Tagalog (and Filipino). This can be seen in the dictionaries and even Google translate (as well is in my wife’s Visayan which is the same as Cebuano). Some Cebuano speakers I have heard occasionally shortcut to “o” and I don’t ‘think’ that is done much by Tagalog speakers. The word itself, for “yes”, is one of many words common to these languages. My relatives in Siquijor often used the shortcut “o”; personally I don’t hear it much here. Although O (“oh”) and OO (“oh oh”) sound different, I will mentions that common Visayan spellings seem to change from island to island. “Kaayo” here is “kaau” in Bohol for example. Just guessing, I suspect Tagalog and Filipino have less variation and no shortcuts (that I can see) Perhaps it is more formally established. Is Glendazumba still around? I think she teaches Cebuano.


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  6. jimeve

    jimeve DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer Veteran Army

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    P-oo
     
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  7. Jens K

    Jens K DI Senior Member

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    I didn’t learn much of the language when living in the NCR some years ago, but I believe “opo” is Tagalog for yes.
     
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  8. djfinn6230

    djfinn6230 DI Senior Member

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    After doing just a bit of research about Philippines languages on Google, the topic of languages here is way more complex than I ever thought. What really confuses things is that more than one language or dielectric is spoken in a single sentence so you cannot use personal experience to draw conclusions. You can consult translators like Google but their information is derived by whom? People who speaks words of different languages which in their opinion is “cebuano”? Warning: This thread may be going down a rabbit hole. Exit stage right.


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  9. Notmyrealname

    Notmyrealname DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer

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    Are you the SAME Jimeve who wrote 'A fully annotated treatise on the subliminal complexity of symbiotic language inter-relationships East of Java 31st April 1834 to 29 February 2020, Vols 1 to 999'? Or am I thinking of someone else? Merry Xmas and a Happy 2021.
     
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  10. djfinn6230

    djfinn6230 DI Senior Member

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    Google translate indicates the both opo and oo mean “yes” for both Cebuano and Filipino. Google does not translate Tagalog for some reason but Filipino is a new language written for the whole nation based primarily on Tagalog with other languages thrown in. I believe you are correct and so are people who claim oo is yes. However, the single “o” translates to “or” even though we know that Cebuano speakers use o as a shortcut for oo which is also yes in both languages.


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