Dumaguete Info Search


BUILD YOUR OWN HOME OR BUY READY BUILT

Discussion in 'Hobbies and special interests' started by DAVE1952, Aug 11, 2021.

  1. danbandanna

    danbandanna DI Senior Member Veteran Marines

    Messages:
    847
    Trophy Points:
    276
    Ratings:
    +1,267 / 274
    Blood Type:
    A+
    Already have watched all of Texas Filipino vids and will use the all thread PVC method to build forms, I think snap ties would be hard to find here anyway...
     
  2. Notmyrealname

    Notmyrealname DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer

    Messages:
    4,510
    Trophy Points:
    356
    Ratings:
    +5,085 / 2,706
    Enough talent here to create a construction firm (two not in the country yet) who, without doubt, could build high quality homes. Hope members get a discount.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. ONEARM

    ONEARM DI New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Ratings:
    +1 / 0
    Blood Type:
    O+
    Best Answer
    G'Day all.
    I have read a lot in this thread and from what Dave has shown in his posts and photos, it is all too typical throughout the building industry in just about every country where there is no formal control.
    I am a 'crusty' old builder and Quantity Surveyor with over 4o years of experience in South Africa and Western Australia.
    Like with many subjects, it takes years to gain experience, that is why the Quantity Surveying degree is a 5 year grind. Unfortunately, like with many things people who have little real knowledge on a subject, offer advice to others that is not correct, leading to problems down the track.
    I am currently in Thailand building a coffee shop / bistro for my girlfriend. I am doing about 80% myself, mainly because it drives me made the way things are done here and I would land up redoing about 50% or more! So I just save myself the stress. I takes me longer, because I can really only use my right hand due to a brain 'condition'! (Thanks Aussies!!) Anyway there is always a way to get the job done.
    The initial post was about getting someone to 'certify' an existing building in Dumaguete. Nobody in their right mind would even think of it, unless they have personally supervised the work. Even if you offered me a million dollars I would not do it.
    To help out, I am preparing a very basic reference document divided into sections by trade. Although I am not familiar with building in Philippines, it cannot be too different to Thailand as I can see from Dave's photos the similarities. There are fundamentals that apply anywhere in the world.
    It will take a while to complete, as I'm usually doing physical stuff during the day and a one finger typist when I get to the computer of an evening or early morning.
    I am not sure if I should start a new thread or not. Could admin please advise me?
    Thanks, and hope that wasn't too long winded.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. ONEARM

    ONEARM DI New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Ratings:
    +1 / 0
    Blood Type:
    O+
    Hey Dave, your pics tell a lot of what is not right. Firstly, concrete is made of sand, cement and coarse aggregate (crushed rock or stone), usually not bigger than 19mm. Never rounded river stones of that size for structural work. The angularity of the aggregate plays a significant part in the binding of the sand and cement which fill in the voids between the aggregate. There are specific mix proportions to attain the compressive strength of the concrete. Normally 30 Mpa (Mega pascals) for columns (not pillars) and beams. Very important to the strength of concrete, is the amount of water used. This is a water cement ratio that should be closely adhered to, as excess water leads to excessive shrinkage and cracking as the concrete cures. There are very good additives for concrete that increase work-ability of the mix while adding strength. I used this for concrete counter tops recently and it was great.
    I agree with you completely about using a vibrator, anyone doing a reasonable amount of concrete work should buy one, they are not very expensive.
    I do not agree with you about pouring columns and beams together. You just leave a bit of the column reinforcement above the level the column concrete is cast to, (usually underside of beam), to be bent over later and tied to the beam reinforcement. Also, generally they bucket the concrete up to pour it into the forms, so filling 2.7 M (9 ft) is not an issue, as it will get snagged on the way down on the reo. You are correct to say it should not be dropped more than 1.5 M, but that really relates to pouring a slab. Like we said, vibrating the concrete is important to get rid of the air pocket and voids around the reo.
    [​IMG]About 5,000 Pesos
     
  5. OP
    OP
    DAVE1952

    DAVE1952 DI Forum Adept Showcase Reviewer

    Messages:
    314
    Trophy Points:
    176
    Ratings:
    +465 / 103
    Blood Type:
    I don't know.
    No sir, not long winded at all, mind you I guess I am a little biased as you agree with much of what I have said before.

    Now I want to ask you a question, understand that the building medium here is mostly CHB and I think it is the worst product ever to build with and no better than Lego block with a flour and water glue, also I would add that the average PSI of such buildings can be no better than 500 at a very wild guess. But the question is; what is your opinion of this method and does it have any real merit?
     
  6. ONEARM

    ONEARM DI New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Ratings:
    +1 / 0
    Blood Type:
    O+
    How did you get on with your wall mate?
     
  7. ONEARM

    ONEARM DI New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Ratings:
    +1 / 0
    Blood Type:
    O+
    Hey Dave, I take it CHB is cinder hollow-core blocks. Correct? In that case, yes pretty useless, but in terms of masonry, there aren't too many alternatives. They use them for about 95% of construction here too, one of the reasons I have gone for steel frame. The blocks, catch pits, and other so called concrete products have an empty cement bag waved over the mix hoping there is a little left to give it a gray colour! They crumble very easily. I think they rely on the thick bed of mortar and a bit of infill in the holes to give it strength. I would certainly not rely on them for too much load bearing, that is why generally, the roof steel work is fixed to the concrete columns with a bit of a tack weld. The other problem of course is that the act like sponges and because generally, there is no damp proof course to stop the rising damp.
    I am writing a bit of a building guide to try to help people avoid the pitfalls.
     
  8. Ozzyguy

    Ozzyguy DI Member

    Messages:
    229
    Trophy Points:
    91
    Occupation:
    Almost retired
    Location:
    Perth
    Ratings:
    +294 / 167
    Blood Type:
    I don't know.
    Welcome Onearm, what part of Thailand are you in and what brings you to this forum, thinking of relocating?
     
  9. jim787

    jim787 DI Senior Member

    Messages:
    530
    Trophy Points:
    225
    Ratings:
    +406 / 36
    There are some competent builders in Dumaguete, both foreign and domestic. If you have experience with one, post a recommendation, as we do with doctors and dentists. No need to post negatives by name.
     
Loading...