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Suggestion Change Ceramic floor tiles

Discussion in 'Property Development' started by Jack Peterson, May 16, 2017.

  1. SkipJack

    SkipJack DI Member

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    I don't know.
    Because so many of them are warping the same way it looks like this is an issue of expansion/contraction. The sun shining on the floor heats up the tiles faster than the concrete below them. Maybe the person below you is running their air conditioner while you are not.

    I always wondered why the grout lines were so wide:
    Grout joints also allow for contraction and expansion of the tiles; outside installations exposed to hot summers and cold winters will fail if they are not set correctly and properly grouted. Inside, tiles can buckle and come loose if not properly set with adequate grout and the occasional expansion joint.

    https://www.tilelines.com/grout/

    I am a bit picky when it came to grout lines in my tile floors. I always required that the grout be steel troweled with a spoon after the grout began to set up. This hardens and seals the surface. Tile setters vehemently resisted doing this when I asked and then demanded. I always paid a helper by the hour to do this as the tile setters do not factor in the time when they quote the job. They positively reflected on the results after they finished.

    It is the same as finishing concrete with a steel trowel after it has been floated and the bleedwater sheen has disappeared.

    https://www.concreteconstruction.net/how-to/tools-of-the-trade-and-how-to-use-them_o

    Typically grout is washed with a wet sponge. This washes away the fines and leaves a rough surface that entraps dirt and stains.
     
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  2. cabb

    cabb DI Forum Patron ✤Forum Sponsor✤

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    Any thoughts on what those channel looking images in the mortar are?

    IMG_2521a.jpg
     
  3. SkipJack

    SkipJack DI Member

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    I don't know.
    Often tiles have a pattern on the mortar side. Maybe that pattern is from these or a previous tile that was laid there.
     
  4. Notmyrealname

    Notmyrealname DI Forum Patron Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer

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    I know you are intending to re-lay these, so hopefully my comment will not make you feel anxious, and I don't know who originally laid them, so I may accidentally be causing offence, BUT those tiles were so badly laid. Just going by the alignment alone. Is it possible to find a tiler AND have an opportunity to see his work elsewhere? If someone cannot align tiles then he is not a tiler.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2019
  5. cabb

    cabb DI Forum Patron ✤Forum Sponsor✤

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    No offense, it was done before my involvement, so I don't know anything about it. It's now my second time fixing issues with the original job. At this point, I'm wondering if it's better to redo or keep patching up as things fail. Also trying to understand if there are additional issues at play. Still trying to understand what the failure is. The lifting of both the mortar and tile is a bit disconcerting. I think I mentioned it originally, but I have no idea if I'm talking 10k or 100k pesos, so I'm trying to figure out what to expect to repair. Having been on this forum for several years, I have very little faith in the skilled trades there. There are diamonds, but it's a bit of a crap shoot to find them.
     
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  6. Notmyrealname

    Notmyrealname DI Forum Patron Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer

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    Are there alternative types of flooring? I am thinking about vinyl/lino because of previous experience back home. I took up a rotten wooden kitchen floor that was laid on concrete - the concrete was a bit rough and so employed an 'expert' (lol) to level it using a two part process involving a mixture made up from the contents of a bag and water and then a second layer involving a different mixture. The 'expert' put the two layers the wrong way around and cracks developed in the top layer (which should have been the bottom layer)! He was not paid. Anyway, I fixed sheets of marine ply over the cracked layer and screwed them into the concrete and then laid vinyl on top. The base I had created lasted the 20 years I owned the house and I think I changed the vinyl once. I could say "was that a record" but it would be a bad pun on 'vinyl'.
     
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