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Makati foreigner to be charged for violating quarantine rules, assaulting police

Discussion in 'Expat Section' started by RR_biker, Apr 28, 2020.

  1. RR_biker

    RR_biker DI Senior Member Veteran Marines

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  2. Jens K

    Jens K DI Senior Member

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    stupid getting into a fight, but on the other hand, still pretty ridiculous that the cop demands the helper to wear a mask while watering the flowers, alone. thats the general problem with such rules in countries like this - people who otherwise dont get much to say enforce these rules to the last dot, without the slightest sense of proportion.
     
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  3. Always a Poppy

    Always a Poppy DI Senior Member Restricted Account

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    What's distilling in my mind currently (nothing really to do with the current virus issue), is the general term 'foreigner', used for any non-indigenous person (see article above). It may not be intended this way, but it seems quite demeaning. I've heard it used quite a lot about myself. I'm never referred to as the 'Englishman', 'British man', 'westerner', always the 'foreigner'. I've never come across a country before (sorry, yes I have....Thailand, where they call us ferang and China, where white people are called gweilo (white ghost)), where all non locally born are bucketed into one bracket like that. I'm not sure whether it's borne out of ignorance (until explained, they all seem to assume I'm an American 'Joe', or out of indifference. In westernised societies, I guess the term immigrant is used in equal measure, although I don't think it carries the same connotations as it's describing someone's route into citizenship, as opposed to their being different to everyone else. Am I just being paranoid?
     
  4. Philpots

    Philpots DI Senior Member Restricted Account

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    I think the reason for the identity to an american is because the USA was here at the beginning of the century when they confiscated all Spanish territories. Or they identify americans as coming from the only country that has the money to come here to live. And just one other point. How would any Filipino know you are British, German or what ever just by looking at you and I am sure they cant pick the accent if you speak English?
     
  5. Happy Camper

    Happy Camper DI Senior Member Restricted Account Infamous Showcase Reviewer

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    Japan too, geijin, which literally means alien. If you are Japanese, it matters not, you are a geijin.
     
  6. jim787

    jim787 DI Senior Member

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    "Kano", as an abbreviation for "American", is a a somewhat respectful term of reference. ("Sir" or "madame" is the correct term of address, and they all know it.) If it's used generally for Europeans in appearance, it's probably due to a limited understanding of world geography. Most filipinos, including most high school and many college graduates, cannot even identify or locate islands of the Philippines. China, Japan, the USA are somewhere over the horizon. England, Germany etc. are probably part of the USA. But there are people with an ear for languages who can recognize different accents.

    The term of address "joe", depending on the tone and your street smarts, is generally a racial slur. People who use it have a head full of color and other slur words, even for compatriots of other tribes. One encounters it seldom in Dumaguete and surroundings, simply because there are so many foreigners. It gets old hat. Mostly I have heard it during fiesta, from hayseeds come to town riding in the back of trucks.
     
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    Last edited: Apr 29, 2020
  7. Mark K

    Mark K DI Member

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    I don't find the term "foreigner" demeaning. It is, after all, what we are here, and I can't think of another more accurate term to be honest.

    What amuses me is when Filipinos (not all of course, but many) assume all us "foreigners" have the same likes, dislikes, interests etc, despite the fact that, as a "foreigner", we could be from any one of 194 different countries. It is a constant source of amusement to me (it doesn't annoy me, I just think it's quite funny) when I hear comments like:

    "You should order this. Foreigners like it."
    "Wow, you eat rice."
    "Don't go there. You won't like it. Foreigners don't like it there."
    "Go to this place. Foreigners go there."
    "Have you ever tried Filipino food?"
    "It's spicy. You won't be able to eat it."
     
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  8. jim787

    jim787 DI Senior Member

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    Or you order rice but they serve you fries. The two words sound the same: cannot hear "f", s=z, and long i=short i. So they guess, Foreigner will want fries.
     
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  9. fahr_side

    fahr_side DI Member

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    When you’re wearing something that stands out, or you’re really tall, and they call ahead on the walkie talkie. Not “table for the tall guy” or “table for the pink shirt”, but instead “table for the foreigner”.
    In Taiwan they refer to you as ‘adogah’, ‘big nose’, rather than ‘gweilo’. Slightly less offensive.
    Why is your foreign-ness the only thing about you that can be described or is worthy of description?
     
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  10. anti_crazy

    anti_crazy DI Forum Adept

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    I don't mind the term foreigner. It's a quick way to refer to us. Even I have trouble knowing who is who, except being USA, Brit or Irish for example, but not so much for some European countries. I wasn't sure what nationality the guy is from this story above. I did guess Italian or Hungarian? But is surname is Spanish or Portuguese I think???
     
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