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Philippine top court approves birth control law

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Forum' started by Manzanita, Apr 9, 2014.

  1. Manzanita

    Manzanita DI Forum Patron

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    Philippines approves birth control law | The National

    Philippine top court approves birth control law

    April 8, 2014 Updated: April 8, 2014 11:39:00

    MANILA // The Philippines’ highest court approved Tuesday a birth control law that supporters said would transform the lives of millions of poor Filipinos, in a stunning defeat for the powerful Catholic Church.

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    Comment Rising population needs education, not sterilisation
    Topic Philippines
    “The RH law is not unconstitutional,” Supreme Court spokesman Theodore Te told reporters, announcing a ruling that struck down more than a dozen petitions against the reproductive health law by church groups.

    The law requires government health centres to hand out free condoms and birth control pills, as well as mandating that sex education be taught in schools.

    The law also requires that public health workers receive family planning training, while post abortion medical care is also legalised.

    The Catholic Church had until Tuesday led a successful campaign for more than 15 years against any form of family planning laws in the Philippines.

    Philippine President Benigno Aquino defied church pressure and signed the law into effect in December 2012, but the Supreme Court quickly suspended it after church groups filed petitions arguing it was unconstitutional.

    “This monumental decision upholds the separation of church and state and affirms the supremacy of government in secular concerns like health and socio-economic development,” legislator Edcel Lagman, the principal author of the law, said immediately after the verdict.

    “A grateful nation salutes the majority of justices for their favourable ruling promoting reproductive health and giving impetus to sustainable human development.”

    The Catholic Church, which counts over 80 per cent of the country’s 100 million population as members, had led street protests denouncing the law as “evil”, and at one point in its opposition campaign threatened Aquino with excommunication.

    One of its hardline opponents and a petitioner to the court, former senator Francisco Tatad, said allowing the law to take effect could force Catholics into an open revolt.

    “This means civil disobedience at the very least, actual revolt at the most extreme,” Tatad wrote in a commentary in the Manila Times newspaper on Tuesday.

    “Some of us will want to defy the power of the devil and die as martyrs, if need be, in the only cause that gives us a chance to fight for something much bigger than ourselves.”

    Church leaders have helped lead two revolutions that toppled unpopular presidents in recent Philippine history, and they continue to insist they have a right to influence the parliamentary and legal branches of government.

    Another example of its enduring influence is that the Philippines is the only country where divorce remains illegal.

    Nevertheless, many people across the sprawling archipelago have embraced less conservative views in recent decades.

    A recent survey carried by the respected Social Weather Stations polling group said about 84 per cent of Filipinos agreed that the government should provide free family planning options such as contraceptives.

    It said 72 per cent were “in favour” of the law.

    Women’s rights groups and other supporters of the law say it will be a powerful tool in fighting poverty and cutting the birth rate of 3.54, one of the highest in the world.

    More than a quarter of the population live on the equivalent of 62 cents a day, according to the government, and experts say there is an urgent need to provide free reproductive medical services that the poor cannot otherwise afford.

    More than a third of the capital’s 14 million population live in sprawling slums, according to a 2010 World Health Organisation report, and many of them do not have access to proper sanitation, let alone health centres.

    According to the British medical charity Merlin, which has backed the passage of the law, 14-15 mothers die daily in the Philippines in complications related to child birth.

    * Agence France-Presse



    Read more: http://www.thenational.ae/world/sou...ourt-approves-birth-control-law#ixzz2yKq0081M
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  2. shadow

    shadow DI Forum Luminary

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    Let us all take this moment to welcome the Philippines as the latest addition to the 20th century! I'm sure this will be implemented and practiced immediately.

    Larry
     
  3. john boy

    john boy DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster

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    yes Larry Welcome the Philippines into the 20th century.
    With all it's other problems I fail to see how birth control methods will solve anything worthwhile.
    Everything comes at a price, I can't see the Philippine Government setting up Family planning Clinics can you ?
    Just my thoughts on the subject.
     
  4. shadow

    shadow DI Forum Luminary

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    No, actually I don't see it making a drastic immediate improvement, but at least it may be a step into the real world. The problem will be in all likelihood, those that run the "clinics" will be old school people dedicated to the church and it's ways, so any improvement will come in 50-100 years, if then. By that time the Philippines will have 200 million or so people, or more, and any efforts will be much too late.

    Does anybody remember the helmet law?

    :wink:

    Larry
     
  5. john boy

    john boy DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster

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    Lets look at the 20th Century Western Style
    Age of legal consent is 16 yrs, but you can have the pill under age if you ask for it.
    Sex education for six year olds in school.
    Officially you can now marry your same sex partner, but if you have Christian beliefs cannot choose to refuse a room to gay couples if you own a hotel/ B+B.
    Marriage vows will no longer use the words Husband or Wife.
    Abortion on demand.
    Demoted if you speak out against what you believe to be wrong.
    The list is long and there are many who could put forward a better arguement than me.
    Welcome to the Politically Correct 20th century.
    Sometimes I wonder why expats choose to live in the philippines, I thought that they had become disillusioned with 20th Century Western Culture, I guess I might be wrong......JB
     
  6. Rye83

    Rye83 with pastrami Admin Secured Account Highly Rated Poster SC Connoisseur Veteran Army

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    Legal age of consent was made to stop children/teenagers from being victimized by adults. While it is technically illegal for minors to have sex you won't see many, if any, of them be prosecuted simply because that is not the "spirit of the law".

    If two minors below the age of consent have made a decision to have sex then I see no reason to deny giving them a way of doing it safely. Maybe it has been too long since you have been a teenager. Once they decide on having sex it is very unlikely anything you will do can change their mind. While going through puberty huge amounts of hormones (a chemical, that also happens to be a prescription DRUG) are released into the body. Essentially, their bodies are self medicating with a drug their body has never encountered before. That drug just happens to turn boys into hard headed, risk raking, walking hard ons and girls.....well I have no idea what they actually feel but I'm think it is the start of when they are unable to tell you exactly what they want and think in a logical, precise and unemotional manner. It would be like of your body, all of a sudden, started producing Cocaine and then you were expected to not be confident, social and have an unlimited supply of energy. What you seem to suggest defies human nature. Without a huge and steady supply of social conditioning, teenagers will screw. Simple as that.

    Since parents seem to be taking a more laid back approach to parenting I see "safer sex" as the next viable option. (when I was in school the way we were instructed was that safe sex is no sex, safer sex is using protection and birth control.)

    As for marriage, nobody is telling churches how they are to define marriage. Call it what you like, but as far as the legal definition and the benefits that the state gives to married couple, I see no reason why a person of any sexual orientation should be denied the financial benefits of marriage in the legal sense. The entire reason the state gives tax benefits to married couple is for the economical benefit it gives to society as a whole. It has absolutely NOTHING to do with your religious beliefs.

    And if that's why you think the majority of expats move to the Philippines I would have to agree with your conclusion of you being wrong.
     
  7. john boy

    john boy DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster

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    There are always exceptions to the rule,I'm one.
    "Safe sex is no sex-safer sex is using protection and birth control" I agree!
    However it is not the act of sex that is the problem it is the consequences.
    I also said I guess I might be wrong meaning not everybody has the same reasons.
     
  8. Rye83

    Rye83 with pastrami Admin Secured Account Highly Rated Poster SC Connoisseur Veteran Army

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    I completely agree with the consequences comment. Which is why I don't understand when someone is against the promotion of contraceptives. It is not 100 percent but they are pretty d*mn close.
     
  9. Charlie

    Charlie DI Senior Member Restricted Account Veteran Coast Guard

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    One little correction folks. I keep seeing comments about this being the 20th century.
    This is the 21st Century. We are in our 14th year of the 21st century.
    You might as well catch up now before it's over. LOL
    Just an FYI. :smile:
     
  10. shadow

    shadow DI Forum Luminary

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    Just FYI, do you REALLY think the Philippine is in the 21st century? You are giving them much more credit than deserved. Almost ALL countries except the Philippines allowed divorce in the 20th century or before. It was not a typo or an error, let's welcome the Philippines to the TWENTIETH century! Nobody said anything about THIS being the 20th century.

    They may (or may not) enter the 21st century in another 50 years or so.

    :wink:

    Larry
     
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