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Home & Garden Pizza Oven Construction

Discussion in 'Businesses - Services - Products' started by NYC, Mar 3, 2021.

  1. NYC

    NYC DI Senior Member Showcase Reviewer Blood Donor Veteran Air Force

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    Looking to build (or have built) a wood fired pizza oven for a dirty kitchen under construction. Does anyone know of people with experience in such a project? Vendors who might provide appropriate materials and information? Thanks!

     
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    Post #3 by you_have_been_removed, Mar 4, 2021 (5 points)
  3. Cerne

    Cerne DI Forum Adept

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    Plenty of YouTube videos out there. Getting hold of decent fire bricks and cement would seem to the most difficult part of it. Am sure most hardware stores locally could help out.

    If you are anything like me there are probably 3 Billion ingenious Filipinos within spitting distance of your home capable of following basic YouTube videos. Am sure the extra P’s you pay them to put this together will be worthwhile. Just buy the materials, crack one open and watch. Invite their family along for a free try, you get the drift.

    I did the oil barrel smoker and bbq this way and added a Tandoor oven to the garden too. Kuya n Dong walked away with a few extra bob, happy tums and amazed grins on their faces when they tasted the results.

    I’d love to put a mobile whole lechon roaster together when things get back to near enough normal. Weddings, funerals, Barmitzfa’s...that sort of thing. On a trailer, car battery effort. I did a whole kanding the other day. Marinaded in home made yoghurt and lemon juice, quick rub of some tandoori spices, an open fire. Instant mutton tandoori. Well, took about 5 hours to roast after a 12 hour soak, but was super tender. Man, fire and meat. Endless fun. Think I have found the solution to pointless goat keeping in the Phils (see other thread) too.

    Good luck bud, post the photos huh?
    C
     
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  4. you_have_been_removed

    you_have_been_removed DI Member

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    I did it, bought the bricks on the hi-way in Daro, and just got stuck in and did it myself, a bit dusty cutting the bricks (i would suggest using the days quota of bricks, be soaked at least 24 hours before use to cut down on the dust it's a real real fine dust) will be very very surprised how much water each brick will soak up the excess water will also help in the mortar not drying out too quickly, but will give you a minute or two to set up the brick to its required location, I'm not in the Philippines now, so can't send you pics but it worked a treat in fairness

    two bits of advice if you're going to do it yourself

    be patient, once you get started on the brickwork itself its a lot of cutting, the dome is not so difficult really
    the door ratio to height of dome you read about is not hocus pocus so pay attention to it
    just sit down workout the numbers, dont rush into just to get it finished
    and once its completed what a joy, works a treat too
    I did it all myself everything, planning buying carrying mixing cutting building, sweating crying kicking

    when I went to the brick place and went out the back, to watch them make the bricks and saw the mountain of raw clay, got me thinking we have a lot of clay at home too, watched a few videos how to extract it (stick in water overnight then sieve it as best you can let it dry), i used it for the base of the floor applied it let it crack and dry then filled the cracks, let it dry and fill again 4-inch raw clay base then lined it with the brick to complete the floor and started the dome from that point

    hard to describe the heat from it, before actually putting food in there better figure how your going to slide the food in and out, have the long utensils as the heat is immeasurable out of it and cant stand real close to the door of it, still watching the arm hair re-grow (don't be brave after a few red horse)

    don't be put off by the dome, plan your work, have the brick bought before you start and have them soaking and the bricks are not uniform, they won't all match in size and area but its great to work with clay, and when finished its awesome just awesome

    I went to the lumber yard, bought the big cuts of waste coco lumber, and used that

    I did it from march to June last year
     
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  5. you_have_been_removed

    you_have_been_removed DI Member

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    the local fire bricks will work a treat ( i had that worry too and wasted hours and hours watching videos about that particular quandry about the quality or endurance of the brick, but they are kilned), and the cement too is fine (can add some burned ash from previous fires to portland cement), but i didnt use a whole pile of cement, i made real nice tight joints )
     
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  6. OP
    OP
    NYC

    NYC DI Senior Member Showcase Reviewer Blood Donor Veteran Air Force

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    Thanks to everyone for the input and info. I will track down that fire-brick vendor in Daro and go from there. I don't plan to do the work myself but will use someone from my other building projects who is versed in masonry.
     
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