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Bike Question & Recommendation

Discussion in '☋ General Chat ☋' started by PatO, Nov 6, 2010.

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  1. OP
    OP
    PatO

    PatO DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer Veteran Marines

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    Need more advice please. I put bigger tires on my Nuovo, 90-16 in the front and 110-16 in the rear, along with new interiors (intertubes). Next day the interior in the rear blew a big hole, I guess it had room to expand and move around or whatever. They don't have tubes to fit my wheel so I went tubeless, seems to makes sense. The guy told me bikes with wider tires always go tubeless, is that true? Now I am wondering if I should change the front to tubeless as well, given it is a little larger than the original.
    Btw, still looking for a K-Rouser if anyone sees one for sale. Thanks
     
  2. ronv8917

    ronv8917 DI Senior Member

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    Actually PatO, the size has nothing to do with tubeless or tube type. A lot of monster Harleys with fat tires use tube type to prevent "bead-leak" when hitting pot holes.
    The basic criteria is that "laced" or "spoke-type" rims require a tube type tire because of the spokes, but always a good quality liner must be used. The liner is a rubber strip that goes on the rim to keep the spoke nipples from rubbing a hole in the inner tube.
    Most bikes today that come with "cast" wheels, also called "mag wheels" will always come with a tubeless tire.
    I prefer a "cast" wheel and a tubeless tire. A spoked or laced wheel is hard to clean for us old guys (takes too long) and I can plug a tubeless tire on the rim. I have for years carried a tubeless tire plug kit in my car and I now carry one in my Rouser (Philippine roads have a lot of nails).
     
  3. ronv8917

    ronv8917 DI Senior Member

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    Hey PatO.....did you ever make a decision and/or bet another motor?
    Just curious......
     
  4. ronv8917

    ronv8917 DI Senior Member

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    Hey PatO.....did you ever make a decision and/or get another motor?
    Just curious......
     
  5. OP
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    PatO

    PatO DI Forum Luminary Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer Veteran Marines

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    Rouser

    Ron, thanks for the question. I am trying to find a Rouser, which is the bike I think I would like to buy, but I need to sit on it and get on and off of it to make sure I don't have a physical problem. I got hit in the hip and back when some old lady ran me over and kept going, 1966. I had a back operation but the hip never got repaired so can't lift the leg very high. So I need a low riding bike or keep my 'sissy' scooter as Manzanita teases me. Actually my Yamaha Nuovo is serving its purpose, fast enough and I put fatter tires on it, but once I move I will have a longer ride into town and don't feel safe.
     
  6. ronv8917

    ronv8917 DI Senior Member

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    Well, the size could be a problem. It sets pretty high. I am 5'8" tall (173cm) with pants size of 33 waist and 30 inseams so I am not a tall or heavy guy as such.........and not as "limber" as I use to be. If it is leaning on its side stand, I am ok, but if it is on it's center stand, I can't swing my leg over it. But once I am on it, I can set on the seat and my feet are flat on the ground (important!).
    It comes from the factory with the rear shocks set on the lightest setting and it has three positions for heavier riders, but this does not change the height of the motor.
    I weigh only 150 pounds (68 kg) and Mae-Mae weighs only 92 pounds (42kg) so we ride with the rear shocks on the lightest setting.
    Keep us posted..................
     
  7. RHB

    RHB DI Senior Member

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    Rouser's are a good choice, but the CBR 150cc bike is TINY for a foreigner, they are really quite small, and pricey. I have not seen the price on the new Yamaha 150 yet but I expect over 110000 P. The Yamaha YBR 125cc is also a viable choice and good for off road Dumaguete life.
    I usually buy China bikes, (I'M cheap) and with the caveat that you need to upgrade certain key parts, have proved ok and economical to purchase and maintain.
    Here is what i got for 69,000 pesos. It's a Motoposh 200cc, CBR clone. Cruises at 120. Good around town in traffic and sized right for a bigger framed person. I put about 10,000 in extras, some to upgrade parts like bearings and shocks, but also some performance mods, which are not crucial. (bigger carb and custom exhaust)

    I would post a link to my blog with an article I just wrote about purchasing motorcycles here, but Rhoody is quite sensitive to such things.
    RHB.
     

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  8. ReBelBiKeR

    ReBelBiKeR DI Member

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    @PatO -- arent there any rousers available in the dealers for test drive? or are you scouting for one that's 2nd hand?

    i agree, the motoposh sbk is also a good chinese bike choice. it's also zongshen underneath just like motorstar's xplorer z200... only difference is the dress-up.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    you'll notice from the two pics, they're 90% the same underneath.

    zongshen btw is becoming known in the competitive motorcycle circles, developing parts and even complete engines for other known brands.
     
  9. ronv8917

    ronv8917 DI Senior Member

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    I personally stay away from "off-road" motors only because of the seat height and the higher center of gravity (more top-heavy). But that is only my choice. Since owning the Rouser I have come to appreciate the handling of any rocket-style motor, which I never did before.
    For that same reason (handling) is why I modified my Harley in the US to be a "street-fighter" design. I'm not a real big guy and the Harley weighed 750 pounds (340 kg) and lowering it made it considerably quicker handling for me.
    If you go to the Bajaj website, even they call the Rouser design (pictured) of a Bajaj Pulsar, the "street-fighter version".
    Again, my opinion only, but I would not consider anything under 200cc for riding double here. I like the option of power if needed.
    As always, it is all individual taste and comfort on any motor.
    There is an old expression in the US about Harleys that goes " the price of the motorcycle is ONLY the down-payment on the accessories". How true that is.
     
  10. ronv8917

    ronv8917 DI Senior Member

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    And, let's discuss the Chinese "knock-offs"
    They use to be just that. A cheap copy of mostly Honda.
    However, in the past two years or so, they really have come into their own as a viable and well made motor. They used to be called a "throw-away" motor, but not any more.
    From the ones I have seen and the owners that I have talked to, they are an equal to others now.
     
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