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Getting stung in the ocean

Discussion in '☋ Diving and Marine Life ☋' started by Dong, Apr 15, 2010.

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  1. Dong

    Dong DI Member

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    I took my family to the beach, for 4 days last week, and we encountered some problems.

    As soon as I got into the water, I noticed a stinging sensation. Similar to fire ants, or stinging nettles. It wasn't that bad for me, but the kids were complaining to their mom about it.

    I got my mask and snorkel out, and tried to see what it was, that was stinging us, but couldn't see anything.

    But later around sunset we did spot a red jelly fish, swim right up to the beach.



    I noticed a few small blisters on my arm. No big deal...

    But my son, that isn't quite 2 years old yet, had several nasty red welts, that he couldn't stop scratching.


    We rubbed some calamansi on it, and after the initial shock, he calmed down and stopped scratching.



    Anyone know what unseen critter could have been doing the stinging?
     
  2. Rhoody

    Rhoody DI Forum Luminary

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    At this time of the year it is most likely plankton.

    However my suggestion would be always a kind of skin protection, there are wetsuits for kids as well available as for toddler and babies.

    I bought my little one a nice one, It does not only protect form stings, but also from scratches, cuts or getting sunburned. When she is getting to warm at the beach she jumps in the water.

    Also for teenager and adults I recommend at least a rash guard or 0.5mm dive-skin for protection.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Dong

    Dong DI Member

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    Plankton?

    After a little research, I think your right Rhoody.

    Here's a web page, that explains more about it.

    Bathers' rash
     
  4. balustre

    balustre DI Member

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    Plankton jellyfish locally called "salabay" causes these nasty stings.
     
  5. john reynolds

    john reynolds DI Forum Adept

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    Plankton? do You mean Plankton from SpongeBob?.. just kidding... Anyways, I too have a couple of rashguard T-shirts. One made by Rip Curl and the other made by O'Neil. I keep them there at the house in Dumaguete. I even have one for My Wife, but I think it's a good idea that I buy some for My little Girls in addition to Their swimming suits. I'm not sure if they are easy to come across and purchase over there, but I do know that I can pick them up here at the local Big 5 sporting goods or occasionally at Wal-Mart.For someone like Myself Who doesn't like to get Sunburn they're a very good investment, and an even better investment for Your little ones Who's Sunburns will hurt You more than it does Them..
     
  6. Knowdafish

    Knowdafish DI Forum Luminary

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    Where can one buy a 2X rash guard in Dumaguete?
     
  7. jellyfish

    jellyfish DI Forum Patron

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    Doug, I copied this out of the information in the link you gave.

    jellyfish lifecycle
    Jellyfish feed on zoo plankton, which feeds on phyto plankton, which in turn needs nutrients and sunlight. Once fully grown, jellyfish spawn eggs and sperm, which combine in the water. From the tiny fertilised eggs develop invisible blastula, which are hollow spheres of cells. From these develop planulas that can swim by means of vibrating hairs (cilia). Although invisible to the naked eye, these can sting. For the next stage, the planulas have to find an empty space underneath a rocky overhang where they metamorphose into polyps (scyphistoma). The polyp rapidly buds off many segments like stacked saucers, which detach to become swimming larva (ephyra), completing the cycle as pulsating medusa. When small, these too are invisible but sting. In the right conditions, jellyfish can multiply very rapidly to become a swimmers' plague.


    So now it's also clear I hope why it is my 'favorite' nickname :smile:
    It's not easy to get rid of them and they creep whereever they find an opening, as small even as it it can be :D
    So swimming suites can't easily prevent from getting hurt.
    Especially the ladies have more problems I read in the article.
    I only can guess why, but for me it's my biggest fear as I never wear any suite when diving.
    But luckily I'm a man :wink:
     
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