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Help wanted please ..?

Discussion in '☋ Diving and Marine Life ☋' started by malcolmhills, Jan 11, 2010.

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  1. ScubaProAsia

    ScubaProAsia DI New Member

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    Why they are called Triggers....

    Apparently Triggers jam themselves into crevices to avoid being eaten at night.

    Most people think of feeding sharks as looking like a scene in Jaws. Of course that scene plays as the fish is being torn up by a pack of enthusiastic eaters but the sharks usually just unceremoniously 'suck' the fish out of the holes when they are sleeping. The trigger helps keep that from happening.

    I sometimes wonder if this form of predation is why so many Triggers get seen with torn tails. Could be why they don't seem to depend on their tails to swim ! In days past when shark populations were peak, perhaps many had to manage without.

    It's mentioned in research that trigger populations are moderated by reef structures. In essence there are only so many holes and when you grow up you need to find a new one. Perhaps this is why we see such uniform sizes of fish in one particular area, an example are the Red Tooth Triggers on Apo. The reef itself may be uniform in some way.

    To avoid shark predation tactics like this Parrotfish exude a bag of mucus to sleep in. Apparently itds an awful mouthful to try and suck through your gills !

    Nicole
    Mike's Dauin Beach Resort
     
  2. balustre

    balustre DI Member

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    What Jellyfish calls a leatherjacket fish is also commonly called a leather jack belonging to the carangid family. Trigger fishes are also called leatherjacket fish in Australia and New Zealand. This confusion is triggered (pun intended) when one relies on common names of organisms.
     
  3. jellyfish

    jellyfish DI Forum Patron

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    Haha, that makes indeed a lot of confusion when 2 completely different fishes do get the same names on different places in the world.
    But I know that that happens more often.
    I had a bet with another experienced diver in my dive club when I showed there one of my underwater video's.
    He spook out loud the name of a species when that was presented on the big screen.
    I laughed and said "No dear colleague, it is a ........".
    "No, it is a ......" he replied. "I am damned sure !".
    So the next week I told him that we were both right, because I found out that indeed the name he mentioned was also given somewhere to that species.
    So......you're never 100% sure that another name could be also used somewhere.
    What a mesh we have made, is n't it ?
    Although the Latin names could give less confusion but who is using them except a few real experts :smile: ?
     
  4. nalyn24

    nalyn24 DI Member

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    Hi Jellyfish, long time no see....
     
  5. Maximus

    Maximus DI Member

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    Looks like a gay fish with blue lipstip and fake eyelashes walking around karaoke bars ;P
     
  6. balustre

    balustre DI Member

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    The Hawaiian state fish is a trigger fish named "humuhumunukunukuapuaʻa"...a trigger with a pig's snout. Gay? Not sure but some fish change their sex in their lifetime. Groupers are males until three years old when they become females.
     
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