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Voluntary work on a Tourist Visa.

Discussion in 'Tourist Information' started by EandN, Oct 5, 2018.

  1. danbandanna

    danbandanna DI Member Veteran Marines

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    There are many stories of "help" both public and private that have uplifted those who were unable to lift themselves into productive and taxpaying citizens.... Just let us remember that when we are inundated with stories of welfare cheats and rich beggars... Just sayin...
     
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  2. Brian Oinks

    Brian Oinks That's Mr. Pig to you Boy! :) Highly Rated Poster

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    Correct. While I did not receive Charity as such, due to my diligence, I was given a chance to learn a Trade when no one else would give me that chance in my Teens. So a charitable act helped to carry me through life until I could no longer work, but I did support a family to adulthood because of that chance to learn a trade.

    I think doing the same for those truly in need would go a long way to ensuring that they never need to burden the Charity that is on offer. Instead of building houses for the needy, teach them how to build, instead of throwing food their way, teach them to farm, instead of giving clothing, teach them how to sew and make clothing etc where they may learn a future trade and be able to support their own families.

    In my youth I went hungry many a time due to stubborn pride and eventually worked my way out of the rut I found myself in. Yes I was fortunate, while so many are not, but many would take pride in the ability to help themselves, rather than take a hand out. That is what many Charities should be looking at doing, thinking of tomorrow instead of placing a band-aid over today. "Teach a Man to Fish" so to speak.
     
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  3. ChMacQueen

    ChMacQueen DI Forum Patron Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer Veteran Army

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    My story isn't much different then Brian. When I got out of the military I was in a dark place and ended up homeless. That experience changed me totally on how I viewed charities and those seeking help. While I was down and out struggling to get back on my feet I saw hundreds down and out like myself every day but the difference is almost none of them cared to help themselves even when a golden opportunity came along. Instead they preferred to beg for a few bucks for alcohol, tobacco, and drugs. I even tried offering a sandwich (my 6" subway sandwich actually) to one and had it thrown back at me because he only wanted money for his fix. I've seen others who begged near burger king and were given food they just went down the street to try and sell rather then eat. This also gave me a stronger look into many of the charities I used to think highly of and got me to start researching more and what I found is most of them weren't about helping but about profit while doing the bare minimum of *help* which really just kept the cycle going by giving handouts instead of teaching. I'll also add I sought help from welfare and numerous charities and was told each and everytime including from the welfare office *Your a young white male, their is nothing we can really do for you* which is specifically what the welfare office told me. Apparently to get assistance when your down and out in the US you need to be female or a minority preferably both.

    The US had a program during the 1970's-1980's that was teaching dry farming techniques to African would be farmers and farmers. After the program ran for 15 years or so it was scrapped because the farmers had made no progress. Equipment they were given was pawned off for a quick meal and the farmers didn't keep up their work to produce anything real. The program when ended was replaced with another program that instead simply sent medical supplies, food, and some other item aid. That program after a few years was changed as well as those receiving were crying about it and how they could spend the money better to cover far more people. The change was to just give them cash to the government of the African country (forget which, Nigeria possibly). In the late 90's it was revealed the government had bought 18 brand new fully decked out luxury cars for officials and the money looked like it came from that fund.

    Remember that Christian Children's Fund commercial where you could feed a child for the day for the cost of a cup of coffee? They were rated as one of the top 10 worldwide charities. It was later uncovered that less then 15 cents of every dollar reached the children and the rest went into paying salaries and advertising for more money among other expenses.

    In the end you have to just accept some people are a lost cause and cut them off as the humane thing to help break the cycle. If that means throwing one person or family under the bus to do so then so be it if it breaks the cycle and keeps 100 others out of it. Often as well you have to let someone hit true rock bottom before any offer of assistance to climb up may be received properly and most today in western countries have never come close to real rock bottom even the homeless.
     
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  4. Notmyrealname

    Notmyrealname DI Forum Patron Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer

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    They often say that high salaries are paid to the top people at charities to 'retain the talent'. In my opinion, you have no talent if you need an obscene amount of money for what is probably a fairly simple job (with a charitable basis) and often these 'top' bosses (in many walks of life) have no more 'talent' than knowing someone.
     
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  5. Rye83

    Rye83 with pastrami Secured Account Highly Rated Poster SC Connoisseur Veteran Army

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    The vast majority of CEOs are highly educated/intelligent and have motivation and work ethic levels hundreds or thousands of times that of the average person. They are nothing like "normal" people...no matter how badly their company PR teams wants us to believe it. (Actually, your comment seems to show that some people do think they are just like the rest of us.)

    Yeah, there are bad ones that do bad things...but that's just being human.
     
  6. Notmyrealname

    Notmyrealname DI Forum Patron Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer

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    Yes they are - well, like many others but, of course, not like everyone. I am sure we can all think of a high-level but incompetent person we worked with, business leaders who failed their business, sport's team managers (even at National level) who go from extremely high paid job to extremely high-paid job to job but leave a trail of failure in their wake.

    So they are like many other people but they achieved their levels by luck, nepotism, club membership, fooling some of the people most of the time, etc.

    But I am obviously not knocking those who achieve by merit and give good service in whatever they are doing.
     
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  7. Rye83

    Rye83 with pastrami Secured Account Highly Rated Poster SC Connoisseur Veteran Army

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    Sounds like you are talking about low to mid level managers, not actual "top bosses".

    Most workers won't ever legitimately meet the boss (outside of a handshake) or know what goes into the high level decision making, though they are stupid enough to believe they understand it.
     
  8. Notmyrealname

    Notmyrealname DI Forum Patron Highly Rated Poster Showcase Reviewer

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    No, I do include some top bosses - but obviously we differ on this and I respect your views.
     
  9. cccmmm

    cccmmm DI Junior Member

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    Make sure you have the proper visa otherwise you could get in trouble (not likely), but the DSWD could be sometimes not happy about it.....specially if there is money (value) involved.
     
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  10. saltygunny

    saltygunny DI New Member

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    Check the you tube of "A foreigner in the Philippines". he is on the verge of being deported for helping people building bamboo houses, food, medicine and getting donations from his subscriber to do that. he is. married but has still not change his visa . he has been married for about 4 years. but check his you tube channel and you can see the results of helping people with out the proper paper work being done....
     
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